Thursday, February 5, 2015

It's the Grand Opening of the Halle Heart Children's Museum!


The American Heart Association's Halle Heart Children's Museum is hosting its Grand Opening this weekend in Tempe! Until recently, the Halle Heart Museum has only been open for school groups and organized field trips. However, thanks to a grant from Tempe-based Insight, Inc., this weekend marks the kick off of the Museum as it opens its doors to the public at large!

So, what is the Halle Heart Children's Museum? Well, it's an interactive, hands on museum, dedicated to teaching kids all about the heart, how it works, how it compares to the organs of other animals, and how we can take care of one of our most vital organs!


You'll find 8 huge sections in the museum, where you can explore the anatomy and mechanics of the heart, how exercise affects the heart, the effects of tobacco on the heart, and more! There is also a spacious theater, where you can see movies about how the healthy choices affect heart health, or how to recognize the warning signs of a heart emergency and how to call for help.


If you want to check out the Halle Heart Museum, here's the info!

Hours:
For the Grand Opening: 
Friday February 6th from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm
Saturday February 7th from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm

Regular Hours
Monday through Friday 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am to 2:00 pm

Admission:
$5 for visitors aged 4 and older, free for kids 3 and under. On the days of the Grand Opening, the Halle Heart Museum will be giving FREE admission to those wearing red in recognition of The American Heart Association's National Wear Red Day!

Location:

2929 South 48th Street, Tempe, AZ 85282
602-414-2800


NOTE:

GIVEAWAY HAS ENDED! CONGRATULATIONS "TICKLE"! PLEASE SEE THE REPLY TO YOUR COMMENT FOR INSTRUCTIONS TO CLAIM YOUR TICKETS! :)

In celebration of the American Heart Association and the public opening of the Halle Heart Children's Museum, we're hosting a giveway for four general admission tickets to the museum! All you have to do is leave a comment on this post, with something you or your kids know about the heart. The winner will be chosen at random by Friday, February 6th, at 12:00 pm. These tickets will be good for any visit, at any time!

Of course, if you want to prepare a human heart lesson ahead of time, you can always check out our model of a heart pump, and anatomical model of the human heart. You can also order a dissection kit from Carolina Biological Supply, and conduct your own heart dissection!



HAPPY EXPLORING!






Monday, December 15, 2014

The Twelve Days of Science! Day 12: Marshmallow Explosions!

On the 12th Day of Christmas Science, my mommy made with me...
Exploding snowmen and marshmallow peeps!


For our final project in The Twelve Days of Science, we're taking a look at the science of marshmallows and experimenting with them! We have marshmallow snow people and candy cane peeps and as adorable as these candy critters are, they had better watch out! For we have been concocting some crazy plans of science and these little guys are not long for this world...

Before we get into our science experiments however, we need to take a look at what these marshmallows are made of! Consisting primarily of sugar, water, and gelatinous proteins, the molecular structure of these confectioner's delights is mostly open space. Essentially, marshmallows are made of fluffed up sugar water and held into place with gelatin. This allows them to have their puffy texture, keep a consistent shape, and have that sweet taste that many of us enjoy.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Halloween Science: Goblin Eggs!

It's about to get messy in here!

Halloween is my favorite time of year and it's a great time for science! From sticky slime to shrunken heads, it's a fantastic time to get messy and experiment with the world around you!

One of our favorite science experiments is the Naked Egg experiment. This is one of the first chemistry experiments we ever did, and we love it! The result can be a bit messy, but it's a lot of fun! When I had my niece over for Fall break, we tried it again. Only this time, we gave it a bit of a Halloween twist...

Monday, October 6, 2014

Let's Take A Trip Through The Digestive System!


We're going to make a digestive system cake, eat our digestive system cake, then...
DIGEST our digestive system cake!

It's an anatomy cake of SCIENCE!!!!

Today I'll share how we made our digestive system anatomy cake, took a blind taste challenge, and modeled the process of the digestive system! You can find the projects listed throughout this blog post (with a cake finale!), and links and resources at the end. But first, let's take a look at how the digestive system works...

Saturday, September 20, 2014

It's A Bat Tunnel Extravaganza With The Scientific Mom and AZ Game and Fish!

This post covers the epic turnout for our field trip to the Phoenix Bat Tunnel. For information on both Bat Tunnel locations, as well as further reading and educational resources, please scroll to the bottom of this page!

Bats emerging out of the 24th Street overflow tunnel in Phoenix.
Photo Credit: Eric Proctor, AZ Game and Fish Dept.
Ever since we found out about the urban colony of  Mexican Free Tailed Bats in Phoenix, Kat and I have gone every summer to check them out. Every year, between the months of May through October, we make our way to one of the downtown overflow tunnels to hang out with 10-15,000 Mexican Free Tailed Bats! Last year, we decided to invite our friends and fellow community members to join us. We had approximately 40 people come out to learn all about megabats, microbats, bat anatomy, echolocation, and of course, to see the colony of Mexican Free Tailed Bats as they took off to hunt for the night!

Our first field trip to the Phoenix Bat Tunnel was a great success!
Photo Credit: Devon Adams 2013

Last year's field trip went so well, we decided to make it an annual event. This time, my good friend Eric Proctor, the Wildlife Educational Coordinator for the Arizona Game and Fish Department, got involved with us and threw in some wonderful surprises! Not only would we invite our fellow nature lovers out with us again, but this year our presentation would include mummified bats, live bats, bat skulls and skeletons, and sonar listening devices that we could use to listen to the bats as they used echolocation to hunt at night!

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

It's An Intergalactic Geek Extravaganza At Burton Barr!

Have you ever wanted to have story-time with Darth Vader? Have you ever wanted to meet real superheroes and find out where they got there powers from? Have you ever wanted to hang out with real Jedi Knights as you work to protect the galaxy?

Pretty In Pink
Darth Vader at Burton Barr Library
If you love Superheroes, Science, or Star Wars, then you're going to love what the Phoenix Public Library has to offer this month! As a part of their library card extravaganza, the month of September is going to be packed with all things geek! The only tickets you need to get in can be found on your library card! If you don't have a Phoenix Public Library card, do not fear! They can sign you up at the door (it's free!), as you waltz your way into the a geek's paradise.

Friday, August 22, 2014

Dissection: Let's Take A Look Inside The Heart!

This post contains images of a heart dissection. There is no blood in the heart or in these pictures, but there are several close up images of the dissected heart and muscular cells! 

When Kat and I were learning about the heart and cardiovascular system, we really wanted to get an in depth understanding about the human heart and how it works. We had built a model of a pump to mimic a heart, we had made up a circulation game with little blood cell pieces, and we had even made an anatomically correct model of the human heart! What we hadn't done, was look at a real heart, in the flesh, and see how we we learned looked in reality.

For this, we turned to the tried and true method of biological dissection! A biological dissection is a very detailed examination of a deceased (and sometimes preserved) plant or animal. It often involves cutting it open at specific points to get a good look at the inner workings of the organism. Kat is no stranger to doing dissections, as she did her first when she was four years old. She had found a giant crab spider that had perished in our office and wanted to take a look at it. She actually made a fascinating discovery, that spiders have almost metallic looking springs loaded in their pedipalps (pads on their front two legs) that they use in mating!

Kat's crab spider dissection, featured in
The Not So Creepy Crawlies